Tuesday, March 13, 2012

Pinterest- Window Shopping With Other People’s Stuff

In a recent Techie Tuesday, Teachers were happily pinning away ideas, photos, Youtube videos, and lesson plans they found online. On this particular day our learners were all female. We did get into a little discussion about which gender uses Pinterest more. Turns out our male trainer in the room, @catlett1 was adamant that Pinterest is for women. However, in the UK there are more male Pinterest users than female. 56% to 44% in fact! In the United States it is no less than 83%. Either way you slice it, millions of people, males and females are pinning away. To me Pinterest is like window shopping at Christmas.

Pinterest is another strand in the spider-web of social media. It lets you pin your blog for greater exposure, pin your own Youtube videos, but it also opens the door to go get other people’s ideas, products, and information. Pinterest apparently captures the entire image most of the time, which appears to cross the copyright lines of using other people’s stuff.

Pinning does beg the question “Is it OK to pin other peoples stuff?” As we were discussing ways to use it one of our Twitter friends @chericson tweeted out an article about Pinterest and copyright laws. It was an eye - opener for sure and raised a lot of questions about the legalities of pinning other people’s information.

So here are some things to remember when pinning: Pinterest places all liability on you as the user. (I only read the fine print from the article mentioned above). Always give credit to the author, photographer, and movie maker. Can’t really promise this will protect you, but it is always good practice when sharing information whether you are Tweeting, Scooping, or Pinning. Use Pinterest to promote your own digital content and then you are completely safe.

It seems like people love to jump on the latest tech bandwagon, but this one appears to be staying. It will be interesting to watch user policies and legalities. Would you want your photographs on other people’s boards? It probably depends on the artist. Should Pinterst develop requests to pin your stuff? I would not be surprised! Look how many times Facebook has changed it’s policies multiple times. With 12 million users to date, Pinterest will have to be on top of its policies as well! Happy and safe pinning to you!

Written by Jenny Krzystowczyk

129 comments:

  1. It is always important to remember copyright laws, but yet when someone puts something out on the internet, they need to also remember that they are allowing their thoughts and ideas to go numerous places.

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  2. After reading one of the first articles for class I was more concerned with copyright laws. I always try to reference the blog, or whatever the source may be when pinning something. I know that if I put something of my own out there that I would feel happy knowing others liked and could use whatever it was they pinned of mine!

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  3. I also thought about the copyright laws when I first started. I was repinning others ideas to my board and it made me nervous. But if someone is putting it on Pinterest, then they should know that their ideas are being shared.

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  4. I have been worried about copyright laws as well especially from the first article we had to read. Before this class I mainly used Pinterest to repin ideas. Now I have learned how to pin my own as well. I totally agree with Nicole on the fact that if they are putting it out there on the Internet, it is going to countless places and a lot of eyes are viewing it. I would have to say that I would agree that a lot more women use Pinterest! We are always looking for great ideas!

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  5. My husband said Pinterest used to be a place that was more for artists to share their work so I suppose then it would've been for both males and females. I know he used to use it. As far as copyright goes, it probably is a good idea to give credit. I also think if you have a good idea, why not share it?

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  6. Publishing the things that interest you is obviously the point of PINTEREST (hence the name). The biggest positive for me is the ability to get and organize ideas so that they are easily retrievable. I'm sure there are thousands of us who are interested in sharing without claiming credit because we got the idea from someone else anyway. Yet intellectual property and technology will probably be what many new lawyers will focus on.

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  7. I have found that over the last few more months more males are seeing what Pinterest is all about. I can definitely see where it can be viewed as a site for women, but when males start pinning more, then it is quite obvious that there will be more boards/pins directed toward the male population. It is also a bit scary to think of all of the copyright issues that may be involved with Pinterest. I hope that it will not become such an issue that more and more people are "scared" away from it or Pinterest is no longer a free website.

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  8. Copyright is an intimidating topic and I can see it being huge with sites like Pinterest. After discussing copyright with my students this year, they seemed pretty convinced that the teachers were all going to jail for showing videos, but on the other hand, they have some pretty lax opinions about their own use and reuse of technology. In the mind of the average 5th or 6th grader, anything on the internet is fair game. We all have a lot learn about copyright, but the difficulty is that the technology seems to be evolving faster than the law... good luck!

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  9. Cindy - I'm always thinking about copyright laws. I enjoy getting ideas from others and repinning. Hopefully, giving credit to the original pinner is acceptable at this point.

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  10. Copyright is an important issue that is certainly perplexing to many of us. I think a lot of the issue goes back to the INTENT of pinning content and if the appropriate credit is given. I would expect to see many more changes to Pinterest, including permission to pin content, in the not-so-distant future.

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  11. If one puts it on the internet, one should be prepared to share it with the world. I wonder if in the future copyright laws will become more lax? Does government have the money to patrol the internet for copyright violations? Flip side, people watching the internet for copyright violations would put unemployed people to work.

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  12. I am not sure if my comment posted before, so I am going to try this again. . .
    I, too, was thinking a lot about this after reading the first article for class. I also think it is important to protect yourself. I love to take photographs, and it is really easy to pin them and have others repin. Make sure to take credit for what is yours and give credit to others as well!

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  13. I am surprised that men don't use Pinterst more. Afterall they are very visual creatures and Pinterest is driven largely by photos. Even the articles are set up with big, bold graphics. Businesses could really use this site to promote and get their name out there with a little creative usage.

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  14. I think Pinterest is a great resource whether you're male or female. It provides you with a great opportunity to find and organize ideas that will be helpful in your classroom. As far as the copyright laws; it is a little scary. Hopefully pinterest will continue to make changes to its policy, so people don't get in trouble.

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  15. My husband said the same thing as Brent (about Pinterest being just for women)when I told him he should try using Pinterest, but I think that's because all the boards I showed him belonged to women. When I showed him the #tt4t board, he got a little more interested. It really is a gender neutral tool.

    Regarding the copyright laws, well... we all just need to be careful I guess.

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  16. I am a little concerned about the copyright issue. I always make sure the pins are linked to the original website/source. Do I need to give more official credit in the caption? That doesn't sound very appealing. I also have noticed a few people have started following me that I don't know and sound like they may be spam or marketing ploys. As far as I can tell, you don't have to give permission or allow people to follow you. Hopefully they change this privacy setting soon.

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  17. I can see the "women" thing as my wife and sister-in-law are avid Pinterest users and I never heard of Pinterest before. I do like that the things I have pinned so far came with credit for the original source. Guess I will have to be careful to always check future pins.

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  18. The whole copyright issue is a bit daunting. The presumption seems to be the if someone puts something on the internet then they have to know that it will be used by people who have access to it. Right? It is such a gray area because the average person doesn't really know (or want to know) what is acceptable and what is not. Pinterest has tried to solve this problem for their own sake by putting all responsibility on the users. My issue is that primarily I am still learning about Pinterest, but if you are providing a link to something you've pinned, doesn't that mean you are not taking credit. Is that a stupid question??

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  19. I agree that the whole copyright issue is a bit daunting! With being new to pinning, I just assumed the ideas out there were available for anyone to grab. Reading the article about copyright laws and pinterest makes me realize the importance of appropriately giving credit where it belongs.

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  20. I think that giving and sharing of ideas is so beneficial to education, and if people are putting their ideas out there then I would assume its free for me to use. Of course one needs to give credit to other people and not use ideas found on Pinterest or any other site for personal or financial gain.

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  21. As stated by many others, Pinterest has fantastic possibilities for sharing ideas. However, it is clear how important it is to cite your source before sharing. Therefore users should think twice before pinning a source.

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  22. Its always important to site your source when using anyone's ideas online, not just on pinterest! It will be very interesting to see over time if Pinterest changes the rules on how to pin things on boards. This article really has given me a realization on how important it is to cite your source and give credit to the original user!

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  23. This and other articles like it make me nervous...I don't pretend to know much (if anything!) about copyright laws...maybe I should look up some "basics" about it and take another look at what I have pinned. Teaching ideas are probably "safe"...why would teachers put their stuff out there if not to share it with others?! But, some of my photos (of cool or exotic vacation places) may not be from the Pinterest "author".

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  24. I agree that I feel comfortable with teacher ideas, lesson plans, etc. We put those out there because we want to share. When it comes to pinning music videos, clips, composer photos, etc, I need to think twice. The copyrights are so vague in these situations. I would hope like in the music publishing business, there is a different set of expectations when pinning things to be used in the classroom for educational purposes.

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  25. The article brings up valid points about copyright laws. This is another area where technology surpasses the legal system. The truth of the matter is that you can pin anything you want, it us up to the person who owns the material as to whether you get into trouble or not. Personally, I think it would be better to ask then pin, but it may not be feasible to do that every time.

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  26. I feel comfortable with pinning teacher ideas. Those ideas were posted with the intent to share. When I first started using Pinterest there would be fabulous pictures of places I would love to travel. It didn't even occur to me, at that point, to see where the pictures had come from. I started pinning them just to remember. No longer does that board exist. I do not want to deal with any copyright issues.

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  27. As a librarian, copyright is something I get asked about a lot. Fair use guidelines are so vague, that I always say be safe and cite your sources. Many staff and students do not realize that not everything on the internet is free use and we really need to train more on the importance of copyright and digital citizenship in this cut and paste (or in this instance, pin) world.

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  28. I believe if it is on Pinterest it is there to be shared. I also believe to give credit where credit is do, meaning I use something off of a somebody's Pinterest I will give them credit. But, if I put something on Pinterest, I believe it is there for everyone to use and share.

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  29. Caroline PetersenJune 21, 2012 at 5:31 PM

    It's quite overwhelming to think about copyright law violations, especially since Pinterest makes it clear that we are liable, not them. However, it's encouraging to know that the company is attempting to improve their site. The fact that they have started providing publishers with opt-out codes for sharing content will help minimize the copyright issues. In the meantime, I will be sure to reference my sources!

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  30. I'm sure many people don't even think twice about copyright law violations when using Pinterest. As educators, most of the resources we pin are meant to be shared. I think everyone should keep in mind that they need to give credit to the creator of the source. It will be interesting to see if Pinterest changes their policy and will require permission to pin items. We live in an age where we want things immediately so I don't think that would go over too well with the Pinterest users.

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  31. Copyright always scares me. I would never intentionally steal someone's stuff, but I do like the idea it mentioned in the article of possibly sending requests to ask if it's okay to use their stuff.

    As a writer, I post things to Pinterest that are intended to be shared and would hate to think that people didn't share it because of the copyright laws. Like others above said, I put it out there knowing it will get re-pinned and that's exactly what I want.

    As for the male/female ratios, it has always been considered "girly" in my house like Cat said, but then again, we can always get the guys to come on board with a little persuasion. :)

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  32. I think we all have to be very careful about copyright, but I do think most of what we see on Pinterest is posted to be used. I’ve noticed that several education bloggers’ pin their ideas and plans so that you’ll visit their websites. However, I think we should be careful if we’re not sure of a source. Maybe trace it and make certain you’ve given credit where credit is due. I think we need to be especially careful if our students use Pinterest…we should discuss with them what copyright means and how they should always cite their sources.
    Janice Nelson

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  33. The issue of what is leagal and not legal practices will be interesting to follow. I do agree with @catlett1 when it comes to females using it more than males. When I am looking around I definitely get the feel that more females are using this website than males.

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  34. Copyright and the Internet is very tricky. I always try to be careful when reposting or pinning something to give credit to the source, but it is sometimes difficult. If I had pictures or material on the Internet I would not have a problem with someone using the info. or image as long as they weren't making money from it.

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  35. I do see that more women use Pinterest than men. It is a great organizational tool.

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  36. After reading the article on copyright issues with Pinterest, I was disappointed because it seems like such a gray area. I have come across some websites that encourage you to pin things from them, they see it as a free marketing tool. One website I was one had a statement in which they asked you to feel free to pin, but to make sure you cite the source and not just copy paste it into your blogs, etc. I wish more sites would have a statement like that.

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  37. This article brings up a lot of concerns that I didn't think about. I figured that since the pin sites the source it came from when you click on it, it was okay to pin it. I will now be very careful pinning images and information.

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  38. Copyright issues scare me but I also believe that if you are putting something on the web you do expect people to use it but the people using it need to remember to cite where they get the information.

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  39. Copyright issues are very important, make sure what you are pinning is retrievable so you can go back to the site to get web site information.

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  40. The demographics part of the article is certainly interesting. I would be just as curious to know why there is such a large discrepancy between the ratio of gender usage between the UK and the USA. Since Pinterest seems to be a more "geek" oriented app, perhaps this says something about the tech saviness of American women. As for copyright, I think the law will have to evolve with the new technologies. There is a big difference between someone loading copyrighted material to the net (ala the old Napster) and copying material that the originators purposely loaded on the net. In some cases, they do this to further their own ends in the form of direct or indirect advertizing. Aside from the obvious crediting of the source as mentioned earlier, to protect myself I would keep this idea in mind. Does it appear that the owner WANTS the material to go viral?

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  41. Copyright is a tricky subject. I agree with some of the other comments. If it is on the Internet, then it is meant to be shared. The one thing I did not take into consideration is the owner may not have been the person who put the image on the Internet. I will be more careful in the future to make sure that I do not break any laws, especially unknowingly.

    The other article about men and women using the Pinterest was interesting. Not sure why more men in the UK use Pinterest that women. I know that my husband thinks that Pinterest is only used for recipes, decorating ideas, hair styles and other girl interested topics. I will have to educated him and see if I can change his mind.

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  42. The first copyright article we read for this class was extremely eye-opening and thougt provoking. It made me extremely apprehensive about pinning/repinning anything. I agree with many of the other comments shared here. If you are going to put something on the Internet, you should realize it's going to be shared with others. In addition, when I pin something, I am very well aware that it will be repinned. Sharing is one of the greatest benefits of using Pinterest. It's just common sense that one should make sure that they give credit to the original source. It will be interesting to see how Pinterest changes its policies and regulations in the future regarding the topic of copyright.

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  43. I agree that this really makes you think twice before pinning something so you don't break any copyright laws. Would they go after only the original pinner or everyone who repinned after that? Glad I read this article since it brings up things I never really thought about.

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  44. Copyright is a scary issue. I can't say that I would want someone finding a picture of my family or something that I wrote and pin it for everyone to see without my consent. I can see where Pinterest may need to revisit their policy or come up with some way to deal with the copyright issue. I also found it interesting that in the UK there are more men than women using Pinterest!

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  45. I really think it is a compliment if people are repinning your things! I feel honored when someone follows me and then repins my things. Maybe Pinterest needs to put something out there stating that if you are willing to pin things you are allowing other people access to repin them. I think most people won't have a problem, take it as a compliment ;)

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  46. I hadn't really thought much about the copyright law before I read this article. I'll pay attention in the future to things I choose to pin.

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  47. I have been thinking about the copyright issues since the first article that we read for this class. As educators we all share, borrow, and steal one another's great ideas...Pinterest looks to be the same way. In some cases, it might be confusing who designed the work or lesson in the first place. I am hoping for them to add the permission aspect to Pinterest.

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  48. I never thought of the legality of repinning items. Why would you put stuff out there if not for other people to see and use. Now unauthorized use of your name or image is another issue altogether.

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  49. I'm with Sheyrl! The whole purpose of Pinterest is to share! Even if I wanted to find out who the original owner of a pic is, how would I do that?

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  50. The copyright issues are huge. I've been frustrated when I've clicked on a pin and there is no further data, just a picture. That could just be my incompetence though. I'm with Brent for sure. Pinterest seems pretty girly, even to me. However, I love the lush, beautiful, crisp imagery. I think Jenny's right--Pinterest is here to stay.

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  51. Breaking copyright laws with Pinterest definitely makes me nervous. While I agree that teachers who put their ideas on the internet are essentially giving permission to others to use it, we have to remember that those are not the only things being pinned. In the world of teaching I think we all like to share ideas with each other, but some things being passed around are not from teachers. In fact, they are products of hard-working people trying to make a living. I think we all need to be cautious and aware of what we are pinning.

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  52. I hadn't thought about breaking copyright laws before reading this post (and a previous article). I don't think that pinning a picture is "stealing" it, especially because the original website will most often appear when the pin is clicked on; therefore, it seems more like free advertisement/marketing! However, just as Amy mentioned, I have stumbled across images that appear to lead to an interesting article or website, only to discover nothing. These instances could be frustrating to the original creator of the image due to the lack of credit.

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  53. Ha, my husband was just recently making fun of his brother for being on Pinterest as "it's just for ladies". His brother argued that he is using it (with great success) as a business tool (he works in insurance). He also argued that it is helping him connect with more of his female clients and business peers. I'm sure the demographics will change as people continue to use it professionally.

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  54. I think I would want people to be able to repine my thoughts and ideas as it related to education. I do not think as professionals we should keep great ideas away from our colleagues. We should all be wanting to get better, and if you find a great tool on Pinterest, that is awesome. I do completely understand how people would be very concerned about this, but I also think it would be hard to police someone pinning something. I think if credit is given then you shouldn't have to worry,

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  55. I know that many bloggers are VERY happy with the free advertising/publicity that Pinterest drives their way. I can't remember which cooking blog I was reading just this past month, but the author comment that Pinterest currently drives more visits to her blog than does Google. Copyright is always an issue, and for this reason, I think re-pinning is yet another reason for artists of all sorts to watermark their images. Also, if you include some commentary or evaluation in the "caption" of your pin, along with pinning the original URL, that should be helpful in avoiding copyright issues.

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  56. I would think that pinterest should fall under freedom of speech. When I pin or re-pin an idea, I am not indicating that it is my own work. In fact, the fact that the URL is included should serve as a reference to the original material. Also, since pinterest requires that I organize my "pinnings" into boards, it is more like I am critiquing other ideas or work. This latter notion is certainly protected under the first amendment.

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  57. I would think that it would be very difficult to know who the original owner is of most pins. If you don't want anyone to use your idea don't put it on a public site. I am finding many men using the fitness boards and physical education boards. I just hope it isn't me who gets busted for copyright laws.

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  58. Reading about copyright laws can be a very scary thing to think about! I have never really thought about "pinning" and it being a legality issue! I have always just naturally pinned things that I liked without a second through. I am sure that's how many are. Thinking about issues with copyright laws make it very tricky!

    While it could be very frustrating to wait for an original poster to approve our repin, it may take care of some of the legal issues. I think this would cause a lot of anger since our country tends to run on instant gratification. However, just like any other social network, there are going to be issues that must be addressed and changed.

    Finally, I love seeing more men getting involved with Pinterest. In the beginning, I would get teased for how "involved" I was in Pinterest. As time passes, I see more and more men that i know getting involved and joining the Pinterest world! What a great thing!

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  59. I can see that more females are using Pinterest because it is a lot like digital scrapbooking. As more discussions occur about the use of Pinterest and the benefits within the classroom, more educators will use Pinterest.

    As for the discussion of copyright laws, it can get a little tricky. Many of the documents I find on the Internet were shared on teacher blogs. Whether I download them for free or purchase them through educator Teachers Pay Teachers accounts, all have been shared publicly. The whole purpose of Pinterest is to share. I will certainly be more cautious of what I repin.

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  60. I am just starting to use Pinterest. Reading about the copyright issues made me very nervous about pinning. Pinterest is like having 24 hour collaboration 7 days a week. It is especially valuable for educators because they are known for sharing ideas. Many of the teachers in my building are avid users of PInterest, and I see them using many great ideas they found on Pinterest. Pinterest offers super ideas for both men and women.

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  61. Beth Kyes

    Overall, copyright laws are downright scary in every aspect of the media or social networks. The laws seem to change with a blink of an eye. I do look for red flags, but I believe most posts are legitimate and without worries. I feel that if people are posting, they want to share with others. You do have to be careful.

    I have to admit that Pinterest has been stereo-typed as a female social media. I am excited that more males are joining Pinterest. There is so much to offer for EVERYONE!

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  62. Good article. I had no idea that there were more females than males on Pinterest. Also, it was interesting to see that in the UK it's the exact opposite.

    Copyright laws issues happen a lot and I think it's a very gray area. As long as your not using other peoples materials to profit from I think re-pinning should be okay.

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  63. I did get a little nervous after reading the first article on copyrights. But if others are putting ideas out there they should know that they are going to be used. At this time I am only using Pinterest for ideas and have not yet pinned my own ideas. So this would be something to keep in mind.
    I do think that women are the majority users for Pinterest compared to men. I personally do not know of any men that are on Pinterest.

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  64. I think copyrighting is becoming a very apparent issue with pinterest. I wouldn't be surprised if they did like you said begin to make requests to pin others things. I feel that with a website like pinterest people pin things for everyone to see and use. If they didn't want others using their ideas they wouldn't put them on pinterest.

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  65. Copyrighting is a concern, but most people are simply looking for new ideas to try, not trying to take credit for them. Like a previous commenter said, I simply browse and borrow ideas, I do not plan to ever pin my own material to interest. Like any social media or collaborative site, people simply need to be careful and respectful of others.

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  66. All it will take is a successful class action law suit....though like FB, Pinterest by now has its own cadre of attorneys trying to head such an action off with preemptive changes to the application. I do not think the issue is to which gender uses Pinterest, I would prefer to see 'how' each gender uses it. There may or may not be differences, would just be interesting to see.

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  67. I have to admit that I also believed that Pinterest was mainly for female users because they are the only people that I have ever heard were using it. I feel that for the right person Pinterest can be a great resource for anyone. Copy writing issues may come up but as Myers put it the site is so big now and making so much money that it would be difficult to get by the "cadre of attorneys".

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  68. I am new to Pinterest, but I have to say, I love it! I have gotten so many ideas for my classroom, my house, my life....it's amazing! Although, it is kind of like thrift shopping, there is a lot to fish through before I find what I want.

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  69. Copyright issues haven't even crossed my mind when I use Pinterest. I am glad I had the opportunity to read through some of the issues with copyrighting. My husband knows that I have a Pinterest account and also thinks it was specifically designed for women. It is interesting that it is more popular with men in the UK. I would be interested in seeing how men use their Pinterest. I think it would look very different from women's Pinterest. I think the pins, boards, and general organization would look different.

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  70. I'm sure changes will be coming. My first thought was that I'd like to have permission to share from the original person who posted, but think of what a pain that would be! I do not like that just anyone can see my board once they've pinned one of my pins. I'm not sure how to get around this...
    I agree that most educational pins are there to share. The professional photos, inspirational quotes, etc could be a touchy subject.

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  71. The copyright issues are a little scary. It would be a shame to see a lawsuit happen as probably 99% of people using it are enjoying the sharing of wonderful ideas. It's always good to be informed of the legal side of anything.

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  72. I kind of agree with the thinking that if you put something out there for others to see you should expect to share it with the world.
    I was not aware of all of the copyright issues when I was first introduced to Pinterest. I just thought it was a place people got recipes and craft ideas. After doing some exploring, I have gotten lots of great ideas to use in my classroom. It does seem a bit time consuming though, sifting through all the info available. I am sure some changes will be made concerning the legal side of it.

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  73. I am new to Pinterest and hadn't really thought about the copyright issues. I'm just pinning ideas for my classroom - nothing, at this point, that I would consider important in the world of copyright. If I were pinning items that were original works of art, personal pictures, or something related to a business, I would have to think: I put it out there for everyone to see and use and I've lost all control of that. I would be much more hesitant if I had skills or talents that others might want to "steal". My husband might just jump on this Pinterest ride now that he's seen some of the cool pins I've put on a board for things he might use in his classroom.

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  74. Like Teri, I never really considered copyright laws when pinning on Pintrest. I would assume (which I have learned, you shouldn't do) that if someone is putting their work on a website or a social media site they are doing so because they would like it to be seen and shared with others! I know Pinterest is relatively new compared to Facebook, but I am curious to see what, if any, changes are made when it comes to copyright rules and infractions.

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  75. I agree that if someone puts their idea out there, they are saying, "use me." I will be cautious about what I pin though. Pinterest has been a wealth of information for me. I would hate to see some serious restrictions put on its availability. I hope Pinterest is here to stay.

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  76. I ran up against copyright considerations when I asked for something to be enlarged at FedEx last fall. I had left the credit on the bottom of the page, and I thought that it would be OK because of that. The FedEx employee said they wouldn't enlarge the poster because I didn't have written permission from the creator to alter their work.

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    1. I guess I failed to say that my original came from a Pinterest pin.

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  77. I think that most people do not even consider copyright laws when they are online. The brain automatically thinks, it's out there so it's free to use. The reason that people don't think about the copyright is because 9 times out of 10, nothing ever comes of it. But it is important for us as educators to be familiar with these laws to prevent any possible problems from occurring.

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  78. I am new at using this social media tool Pinterest and I love all the ideas I have borrowed from other boards. I thought Pinterest was developed for people with similar interests and “sharing was caring”, but I guess I need to be careful of anything I put onto my boards. I assumed that if I repined something from Pinterest it was safe to use regardless of 3rd party.

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  79. Caitlin McDevittJune 3, 2013 at 7:20 PM

    Since reading that first article about being cautious of copyright laws, I, like others, have been hesitant to pin/repin ideas. I wonder if there could be a way for future website builders to put controls on their photos/visuals to prevent people from pinning them? This would help pinners know what is allowed to be shared and would put me more at ease as I browse. I wouldn't mind being asked permission to share my content, but for pinners with large and well-developed boards, it seems very inconvenient. I will definitely want to know about future changes in the copyright laws that will surely make Pinterest an even better resource for us educators.

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  80. As Jenny K. stated in her blog, Pinterest is indeed "another strand in the spider-web of social media". Privacy and copyright infringements are continually muddied by the ever-increasing social media. My opinion is not intended to be taken as criticism of Pinterest but rather as an observation.

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  81. Keri- leonard Lawrence- I totally agree that Pinterest is like window shopping! Sometimes when I need a "shopping fix" I head to Pinterest and amazingly I am usually pretty happy by the time I'm done and I have a lot more $ in my pocket. As far as the copywrite and all of that, a request to repin might not be a bad idea but I think that waiting for the response will deter people from the whole idea. I guess if people don't want their stuff repinned they shouldn't put it on Pinterest to begin with??

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  82. Kate Bischoff-Bellevue Elementary. Copyright is an issue I deal with as a librarian and I would advise everyone to cite your sources always. Fair use guidelines are very vague and it is better to be safe than sorry. Not everything on the internet is free and sometimes information is uploaded to Pinterest without the creator's approval.


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  83. Nancy Buennemeyer TS Copyright is certainly an issue with Pinterest and one of the reasons I had avoided it. But I also didn’t realize how much on there is probably not an issue. Most educators are likely pinning materials that another teacher has put out there with no concern for copyright. Classroom management ideas, curriculum enhancement, organizational advice – all with the intent of sharing. In general use the problem may be pinning things where the idea is stolen or copied. For instance, as much as I love Etsy, the ideas I take from there and post for everyone to see are in some ways stealing someone’s livelihood – unless my intent is to buy it there, not as a crafter recreating what they’ve done. When you repin some things, you have no idea unless you check. I try to follow the trail back to the original source when possible. Did it already have a pin option there?

    I think the bigger issue for me may be in the use of images. Again I try to follow the trail. If it is an image from Flicker – some are copyright protected. If it is a public domain image off some sites it will say so. I also don’t like posting images where I can’t get back to the original website.

    I had a discuss with a friend over whether it doesn’t benefit the original poster in the long run. If the Pinterest post draws the clientele back to another site its kind of like free advertising. BUT I think that depends very much on what it is and how you intend to use it.

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  84. Karie LauterbachJune 6, 2013 at 10:55 AM

    When reading through articles regarding copyright, I was becoming more and more concerned about all the repining I had already completed for class without giving credit from where I found them. In saying that, how exactly do we give credit for the things we repin and how do we know for sure where exactly they originated from, especially if it's a repin of a repin?

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  85. As a librarian (and former legal secretary), I am also concerned about the copyright issues. Am I going to be sued because I repinned a great idea? I have the same question as Karie, how and where on my pin do I give credit to the person who created the original pin? How do I know for certain who created the original pin? Copyright law is a murky area: even the experts can't always give you a definitive answer to what is and what is not legal. As Pinterest becomes more and more popular, I hope that this issue will be resolved so we can continue to share ideas that make our jobs more productive.

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  86. I never thought about the copyright issue before. I thought if it was on Pinterest it was free game for anyone to pin. Reading this article I now know I need to be more careful. I love this sight and hope that it sticks around for a very long time.

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  87. I had never thought about the copyright law before reading the articles on this issue. It does worry me that one might inadvertently not give credit where credit is due. I would hope that pinterest would be looking into changing their policies on this issue since they seem to be moving all of the blame to the user. I believe most people are using this site to obtain ideas and information, not to pass off others ideas as their own.

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  88. After learning about copyright laws and Pinterest, I wonder how many cases have been filed for rights of the work. I understand the copyright issue, I just wonder if any cases have come to fruition for a violation of material. I'd like to learn more about it!

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  89. It will be interesting to see what decisions come on this topic in the future. I didn't realize until I started reading these articles that Pinterest stores the image itself. I'd thought of them more as bookmarks. As for the questions above about how to know who created the original pin, most link back to at webpage and it seems like the author of the website not the first to pin from it should get the credit.

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  90. Honestly, had never even considered copyright laws until taking this class. Makes you rethink what you are doing while on Pinterest. Call me naïve and old fashioned, but I feel that by sharing on Pinterest, you are freely sharing with others. And as for the whole male/female usage, my husband has yet to go on Pinterest and I don't see him doing it anytime soon. He sees it as a crafty, cooking time of website.

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  91. I agree with many others that how copyright laws pertain to Pinterest is concerning. Since most of the pins link back to an original website, book, etc., is it still necessary to note the original creator/pinner? I will be much less likely to repin sites if I need to go searching for its origin. I also agree with those who have shared the opinion that anyone who originally pins content to Pinterest should be alright with that information being shared and used by others. - Mindi Haase

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  92. When I was looking for resources to use I found a few that did not allow a pin. Maybe that's the way to go, block a pin if you don't want your information shared. Pintrest does appear to me to be a website with women in mind.

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  93. I, too, never gave much thought to copyright on Pinterest. It's concerning considering how many people use this. I would hate to see it go away as there is a wealth of information on it.

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  94. Prior to this class, I too hadn't really thought about copyright. My thoughts are that if you are putting things are Pinterest you are OK with people repinning your ideas. I sure hope this doesn't go away

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  95. I am in the same boat as Amy and many others. I figured if it was out there, with so many using it, it was okay to "pin away." It never really crossed my mind that this may be against copyright laws. I too, feel that if you willingly put things out on Pinterest that you are okay with it being used, If you're not you could always choose not to post it.

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  96. I am in the same boat as Amy and many others. I figured if it was out there, with so many using it, it was okay to "pin away." It never really crossed my mind that this may be against copyright laws. I too, feel that if you willingly put things out on Pinterest that you are okay with it being used, If you're not you could always choose not to post it.

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  97. I think it would (legally) make things a lot easier if the person posting the artwork either (a) had to place a copyright image over the original or (b) only submit a thumbnail. These two options make it less easy to steal images. The images could also have automatic links to go to the website of the artist to purchase an image. Or offer it for free on their website depending on what it is.... I also think that maybe Pinterest could develop profiles, like artist, teacher, etc and options on photos (copyright or thumbnail) so that if the artist wants to freely share then they have that option...??? Just thoughts :)

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  98. My thoughts are that if it is on Pinterest then you want other people to pin and view what you are putting on your boards. I like the ideas that Diana has about ways of getting the artist or writer credit for original work.

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  99. While talking to a fellow blogger, I mentioned the article (mentioned in this blog post) and the discussion about being liable for what you repin or post on pinterest. She told me that at her blogger conventions, it has been made clear or common practice for bloggers to confront the pinner individually and ask that they remove the pin from their board before they can threaten any legal issue. Is this true? I can only venture to guess that they could probably still take you to court, but most of the time if they are not a big time corporation it would be way more money in legal fees than they are willing or capable of spending. Doesn't make it right, but it is a little insight as to the blogger/artist perspective.

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  100. I never really thought about copyright issues with Pinterest. Since I mostly use it for educational purposes, I feel that people/teachers wouldn't post their ideas unless they wanted to share with others. Otherwise each pin is more of a bragging board -- "Look at my great idea, but you can't use it!" I use Pinterest as a way to remember resources I want to use, similar to a bookmark within a web browser. Is that a copyright issue?? I do understand that art and other creativity may fall under a different category, however.

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  101. As far as other people repinning my pins, I have no problem with it. The more the merrier. As far as educational ideas and activities, I think teachers should share with other teachers as much as they can. While sites like teacherspayteachers.com often charge to use their ideas, I love the idea that pinners are open and generous with their knowledge. Whenever I post to my blog or to Pinterest, it is with the intent to share and help other teachers. I only pin/post activities or ideas I have created that I feel comfortable with everyone having access to.

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  102. I think when you sign up for a social media site such as Pinterest, you are giving permission for your information to be used (repinned, etc.). As far as secondary sources are concerned, I see that more and more are using social media as a tool. If you go to some of your favorite websites, you may notice a lot are saying things like "Like us on Facebook", "Tweet @ Us", and many times you do see the "Pin It!" button. I think that if secondary websites do not want their information on these social media sites, there are always ways to protect your content. Like in everything you do, you need to credit the source of the information and since most Pins will directly link back to the original source, I don't see why it is committing copyright infringement.

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  103. I had never thought of the copyright laws before reading the article in session 1. As I was reading it I couldn't help but think to myself, "What is the point of having a Pinterest if you are running into copyright laws by pinning things?" I don't know about anyone else, but I haven't yet put up anything of my own on Pinterest. I always pin other people's pins. I think that if they are going to put it up there, they are wanting others to see it, and are wanting others to have it as well. I think of this a little like any other part of the internet. If you don't want others to see or take anything, then don't put it on the internet. I hope that Pinterest doesn't come to the point where copyright becomes an issue.

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  104. One of the initial assignments for this class was to read an online article by Alyson Shontell related to copyright and Pinterest. After reading the article, I seriously considered dropping this class. Although the pins on my boards include the source, I must admit I am leery about the possibility of future lawsuits should I inadvertently pin something that needs a license to be used. I realize this scenario is probably a long shot. Currently my boards all pertain to education, so hopefully I could claim fair use.

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  105. Copyright is not something I really thought about when I first started Pinterest. I was just so thrilled with everything that I was able to find. After reading a few articles it now seems like an obvious concern. I personally would not have a problem sharing anything that I put up of my very own. I agree though that Pinterest will experience policy changes in the years to come.

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  106. To me, Pintrest is meant to be shared. I would never put something up if I didn't intend for it to be shared. I'm sure it can be done, but trying to find the original "owner" or "pinner" of something on Pintrest seems like it would be nearly impossible. Copyright laws are important and one should always sight their sources, I just find this difficult with the nature of Pintrest.

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  107. Copyright isn't really something I thought about prior to this Pinterest class. However, I do feel that if people post things on the Internet, then they are probably okay with other people re-pinning and using their ideas. It's almost like a compliment! However, I'm also aware that I'm sure not all people feel this way and you could end up with some major legality issues. Something to think about and just be more aware of for future Pinterest use.

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  108. Copyright laws are serious and users of Pinterest should always keep this in mind. It's interesting to me that the site assigns all liability on the individual user when it's their company that developed the site for this exact purpose. If no laws are being violated, then why does the site owner of Pinterest need to have liability assigned to someone other than them? That being said, I think that if any author does not want to assume the risk of their original work of being shared via social media, they should not put it on the internet at all. I'm sure someone will develop a way to "block" people from pinning or sharing an individual's ideas, and they will then sell it to those individuals and make millions!

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  109. The copyright laws are something I have never thought about. I just assumed that if it was on Pinterest you did not have to worry about the copyright laws. If someone does not want their ideas seen or used by others they should not put it on Pinterest.

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  110. The copyright laws for Pinterest I never even thought about. You can find so many great ideas that I assumed if you put it on your board the world can see it. You understand that when you begin with Pinterest your pins are for anyone and everyone to see so don't pin if you don't want people to look at your stuff.

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  111. I have never been on Pinterest before this class, so really gave no thought to the copyrights issue. After reading the librarians comments, I can see there could be problems. I did notice when looking for articles, one person said you could not pin it. .

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  112. Thought I'd posted this already, but not finding my comments. I wanted to just comment on the thoughts of Pinterest being a dominantly female social media website. I know plenty of males with accounts where they organize boards on various hobbies such as gardening, camping, cooking, fitness/exercise, just as many of my female friends do. I think we should give Pinterest a bit longer to be around in the US and we'll probably see a bit more of a rise among male users as well.

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  113. The fact is no matter what is put on the internet it can be accessed and used. Copyright never came into my mind as I found new and interesting ideas for my classroom on pinterest. I have come across many pages that have their ideas for sale, or locked so you can use the idea, but not their specific materials for free. This is a smart idea in the teacher world.

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  114. Before reading this blog and the copyright article I hadn't given copyright much thought. It does make sense and will make me more aware of what and how I am pining.

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  115. Copyright Law is of concern. I can only hope I am completing the pins appropriately and in accordance to the law!

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  116. I believe that everyone should follow the copyright laws. I would hope that credit is being given to the correct people. As Kathy mentioned, I hope that I pinning correctly and giving credit where credit is due.

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  117. It is always smart for educators to be conscientious of copyright laws when using information in a class setting. It will interesting to see the future of Pinterest and their copyright legal battles.

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  118. I never though that paying for things that weren't tangible would take off. When I am looking for ideas to inspire the classroom from pinterest or the web, many come at a cost. This is where copyright comes in to play. Can't say I blame them. Having come up with ideas and sharing them in the building and the district I fully endorse using other's ideas that work for your classroom. Seeing ideas very similar to my own for sale or being used as part of thesis or books and gaining the author credibility makes the idea of payment enticing. Which leads to copyright.

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  119. After reading the articles about copyright, I have been a bit concerned with my use of Pinterest. Copyright is a complicated issue, and I think the policies will need some tweaking as Pinterest continues to gain in popularity. It would be a shame to take away such a wonderful resource for sharing and receiving ideas.

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  120. I hadn't thought about copyright issues before when using Pinterest. But the more I am looking at pins, the more I am seeing people referencing their sources. I think this would be tricky to enforce as so many of the ideas are easily shared.

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  121. I think it is tricky with regard to copyright because in many ways you are publicly bookmarking other people's materials and since other people can see your boards, you are somewhat "distributing" other people's materials. That said, so much of what people pin, others could find through their own searches. If people want their message/material/online content to be viewed, it is more easily viewed when it's pinned.

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  122. Copyright is a serious concern and as an educator, we are reminded of it frequently. We need to give credit where credit is due. After reading the article, I now have more concerns about Pinterest than I was aware of and we need to use Pinterest with caution to protect ourselves. It is most definitely a great source of ideas that are shared freely and we could easily get caught in the snare before we knew what happened. Maybe there should be a system to alert pinners that they need to gain permission before they pin. I am not sure how that would work, but I am sure someone will figure out something.

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  123. I have always been a bit afraid of copyright laws and non intentionally violating them. As a teacher, I try to be aware of the work I am using and give credit to where it is due. This article has made me even more conscientious of making sure give credit to the author or publisher of the work I am using.

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  124. Typically I don't worry about copyright. In the event I use the work of others, I give credit, but I've always thought it pointless to get bent-out-shape about it; many of the laws are convoluted and difficult for the laymen to understand. If someone has a problem and thinks I'm infringing on their intellectual property rights, I'm sure I'll get a cease and desist letter; at that point, I'll stop using the material or take it down. This may not be the best way to go about it; I'm open to being convinced otherwise, but that's where I'm at at the moment.

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  125. As teachers, sharing ideas freely with each other has been an integral part of our profession. With more technology available, we have to adjust to giving credit where credit is due. I need to change my thinking and be more aware of copyright laws.

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  126. There are a lot of great ideas and it is now easier than ever to share these ideas, but we need to make sure that credit is given to the correct people. Copyright used to be so cut and dry but now with electronic devices, it is harder to find the original author of something. I definitely need to pay more attention to citing sources.

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  127. I think that it would be unfortunate if Pinterest went away due to copyright laws. While I understand the laws, I truly feel that there has to be a way to work with them. I like the idea of having an approval button. I think that there should be a way for a person pinning something to either give everyone the ability to share their work or require and approval. Copyright laws are a gray area and we need to be careful.

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  128. It is very important to give credit to others when you borrow their ideas. However with that, I also think that sharing our ideas with each other is how we learn and grow. It makes our world a better place when our good ideas are given out to others to take and use and make them better.

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